ASMR For Sleep – Can’t Sleep? ASMR Can Help You!


You are now laying in bed. You can see by the digital clock that is perched on top of your nightstand that it is now 3:30 in the morning. Even though you’ve been here for the last three hours and the previous three nights in a row, you still can’t bring yourself to nod off and get some rest. You are down to your last chance to catch some shut-eye, so you decide to put on your go-to music collection. You start to feel a tingling feeling spread through your skin like a low-grade thunderstorm. It picks up pace as it passes from your scalp to your spine, and you start to relax as a result. This happens as the musical notes and rhythm begin to wash over you. As the music gradually dies away to nothing, you find yourself falling asleep.

Relax and Fall Asleep to Some ASMR Music

The phenomena known as autonomous sensory meridian response, or ASMR for short, is the reason you were able to fall off to sleep, and I’m willing to guess that you’ve experienced it at least once in your life. A low whisper or the arbitrary and mundane repetition in the sounds of a Hobo Hotel (see: Public Library); the strangely intimate relationship that your hairdresser or barber has with the hair on your head; that shiver down your spine and that feeling of euphoria that you’re feeling in that moment; these are all components of the experience. If you’ve ever heard a low whisper or the arbitrary and mundane repetition in the sounds of a Hobo Hotel (see: Public Library

Insomnia is thought to affect anywhere from 30 to 50 percent of the general population in the United States alone, and of that percentage, around 10 percent suffer from chronic insomnia. This condition may affect people of any age. It’s ironic in the sense that if you were to record and play back, in a loop, the sounds of these people shifting, turning, and rustling in bed, you’d probably end up stimulating ASMR in a large handful of them, turning their insomnia into itself and encouraging a relaxed atmosphere in which they can finally get that sleep they so desperately need. It’s ironic in the sense that if you were to record and play back, in a loop, the sounds of these people shifting, turning

Because there is a lack of scientific data and clinical studies for any true therapeutic advantages of this phenomena, the scientific community would like to bring this to your attention. This indicates that any evidence towards the benefits of ASMR are solely anecdotal in nature. On the other hand, due to the fact that the impact is entirely subjective, it is very unlikely that it would do you any more damage than a glass of warm milk would.

The majority of the conversation over the advantages of ASMR is carried out by “keyboard warriors” on online discussion boards, and the vast majority of the information that we have collected originates from these debates. Is ASMR the same as frisson, or are the two terms equivalent to one another? Can ASMR be replaced by misophonia for a particular sound source, and what factors contribute to this condition? Why are all of these ASMRtists videos so cheesily sexual and fit for cable television?

Don’t be upset if you can’t sleep

Whether it be a little white pill, a glass of whiskey, or ASMR, whether there is anecdotal proof or not, if it helps you fall to sleep, where is the real harm in it? This holds true for any approach that may be attempted to aid a person fade out of existence for many hours. It’s either that or you keep playing Stare into the abyss all night long, despite the fact that morning is drawing closer. You could always try sleeping it off instead, wouldn’t you rather?

Recent Posts